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Improvements are coming soon to CCEC’s online banking. We are adding mobile features and increasing login security. With the enhanced security measures being introduced, we feel that members will be more comfortable switching to online banking or using more online banking services.  

 

A few of the new features include: 

  • Mobile Banking App. 

  • Mobile cheque deposit - take a picture to deposit a cheque to your account. 

  • Get customized Alerts about your account activity sent to your phone or email. 


You will notice improvements on the login screen. It has a new look and you will be asked to set up User Authentication. Here are the three steps to follow: 


  1. On the login screen, you enter your Login Name which is your current Account Number; and your Password where you enter your Personal Access Code (PAC) from the current banking system. 

  2. Set up your User Authentication. Select three questions and enter your answers. 

  3. Pick an image to use as your Personalized Security Image. 


Each time you login, you will be prompted for this User Authentication confirmation. It is random if you answer the questions you set up but the image will be displayed every time you login. The User Authentication takes a few minutes to set up and we feel the increased security will help our members feel more secure and comfortable banking online.


We will be providing our members with more information on the enhancements and improvements to online banking. This is a great time to sign up for Online Banking and switch to e-Statements. Visit our website www.ccec.bc.ca for updates.


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We recognize times may be uncertain and finances may be tight this year. Saving for your future may not be top of mind. However, even contributing a small amount to your RRSP today will go a long way in the future.  It’s not just about long-term growth but also benefits, like lowering this year’s taxes.  More important, your funds at CCEC are invested in your community, neighbours and local businesses.  

Our members tell us that they are with CCEC because we are aligned with their values.  As we are hosting the second Virtual Town Hall on Saturday, January 16th at 10:30am, a member wrote to us saying, “CCEC fills a niche that no other credit union does: a people-centred perspective that sees everyone as an equal no matter their heritage, income, or orientation.” We continue to  be an independent single branch credit union in a financial industry that has been undergoing consolidation for many years. The member reminds us of our history and says, “Where else can BIPOC and employment-challenged communities go for vehicle loans? Where else can social enterprises go that aligns with their values-based mission statements? Where else could a WomenFutures Loan Guarantee Fund exist?” 

The member adds, “There is part of CCEC's original mission that is based on E. F. Schumacher's "Small Is Beautiful" (1973). There is something to staying small on purpose! CCEC has always been about ensuring its acronym stays true: Community, Congress and Economic Change. This is why CCEC exists. “

So, as we are encouraging our members to invest in an RRSP, remember that the funds in your RRSP at CCEC stays in your community and support what is important to you. 

Call us today and ask how you can contribute to, top up or start an RRSP. 

Email Joanne to RSVP for the Virtual Town Hall on Saturday and add your voice to the conversation on the future of CCEC. 


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Saturday, January 16th at 10:30am  is our second virtual Town Hall meeting. We want to hear from our members your thoughts about CCEC’s future and the upcoming Annual General Meeting (AGM).

 

At our AGM on February 4, 2021, we will be reporting healthy earnings in the year ending September 2020.  However, our long term financial planning indicates we will face challenges  The credit union sector is facing enormous pressure with ever increasing regulatory requirements, rising costs and low margins resulting from historically low interest rates. Across the province, over 25% of credit unions are currently considering a merger or acquisition. We want to share with you the informal conversations we have had with other credit union boards on their challenges and opportunities. 

 

Please RSVP to Joanne to attend the Town Hall and the AGM.  Join the conversation, hear what other members have to say and have your voice heard.  A zoom link will be sent closer to the date. 

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2020 was an unprecedented year.  It did not go as we were expecting as Covid impacted all of us.  We have seen loss of lives and changes in our communities and local businesses. As we are set to enter a new year, let’s pause, reflect and identify what is important to us.  

The CCEC Board is inviting members to join us to  discuss the future of the credit union and the upcoming Annual General Meeting. We hosted a Virtual Town Hall on December 10th and our second Town Hall is on: 

As you know, the credit union sector in British Columbia is facing enormous pressure with ever increasing regulatory requirements, rising costs and low margins resulting from historically low interest rates.  While our financial position is strong and we will be reporting healthy earnings in the year ending September 2020, our long term financial planning indicates we will face challenges. Across the province, over 25% of credit unions are currently considering a merger or acquisition.

 

CCEC’s Board has initiated some informal discussions with other credit union boards about what they are experiencing and what, if any, opportunities there may be to collaborate and/or join forces.

 

This is also a great opportunity to learn more about CCEC if you are interested in running for the Board at the AGM on February 4, 2021. Nominations are being accepted for 6 positions on the  Board and 4 positions on the Credit Committee. Click here for more information and to download the Nominations Form. 

 

We look forward to seeing you at a virtual town hall meeting and the upcoming virtual AGM on Thursday, February 4, 2021. 

 

RSVP Joanne  jmackinnon@ccec.bc.ca to attend the Town Hall and the AGM.  A zoom link will be sent closer to the time. 

 

Thank you and be safe and healthy in 2021.


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CCEC’s Board of Directors invites you to join us to discuss the future of the credit union and the upcoming Annual General Meeting.

 

CCEC is a member-owned financial co-operative and the Board seeks your thoughts about our future.


The credit union sector in British Columbia is facing enormous pressure with ever increasing regulatory requirements, rising costs and low margins resulting from historically low interest rates.

 

While CCEC’s financial position is strong and we will be reporting healthy earnings in the year ending September 2020, our long term financial planning indicates we will face challenges. Across the province, over 25% of credit unions are currently considering a merger or acquisition.

 

CCEC’s Board has initiated some informal discussions with other credit union boards about what they are experiencing and what, if any, opportunities there may be to collaborate and/or join forces.

 

This is also a great opportunity to learn more about CCEC if you are interested in running for the Board at the AGM on February 4, 2021. 

 

Please RSVP to Joanne and we’ll send you a Zoom link closer to the date. Thank you and we look forward to seeing you at a virtual town hall meeting.

 

We ae hosting two Virtual Town Halls: 

  • Thursday, December 10th  7:00pm – 8:30pm and 
  • Saturday, January 16th 10:30am – 12:00pm



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November is Financial Literacy Month and the theme is “Understanding Your Finances”. Check the Government of Canada website for practical tips and tools on budgeting, savings, investing, fraud prevention, avoiding debt and building a strong credit history. Learn the 10 things you should know during times of financial uncertainty. 

They are also offering webinars: 

Financial Literacy Month is online in November. Follow them at @FCACan  and #FLM220.

If you have questions or concerns about your financial wellbeing, please give us a call. 

 

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It’s International Credit Union Day on Thursday, October 15.  It has been held on the 3rd Thursday in October for the past 72 years. Did you know there are  291 million credit union members worldwide?  As we reflect on the role CCEC has played in our community and in our members’ lives, let’s share our experiences and invite our friends and family to join CCEC. 


CCEC received its charter in 1976, 2 years after a group of people involved in daycare, consumer and housing co-operatives raised capital to support community economic development. They called their group the Community Congress for Economic Change Society.  Our mandate was to serve groups that have been excluded from the economic mainstream - because they don't fit a banker's idea of a good credit risk - for example, the arts groups, immigrant organizations, housing co-operatives, and similar organizations that continue to be core of our membership. Loans were available to meet our members needs, and for community enterprises and community action. The founding members of CCEC described the loan process as "group solutions to individual problems."  The local focus of the credit union saw the money reinvested within our community. 

Some things haven't changed at CCEC over the past 44 years.  We continue to be guided by the principles that are the foundation of CCEC. We also continue to ensure community input into the lending process by maintaining a credit committee elected from the membership. Also, many directors, credit committee members, and staff are active in community groups that make up our membership.

CCEC is a member-owned, community development organization that is powered by people, like you;  in service of people like you.   Let’s celebrate International Credit Union Day! 


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We’ve come to a fork in the road. We need to decide if we are an ‘oil country’ or a ‘country of nature?’ Do we want the previous status quo, with its now-obvious holes in our health and social well-being nets, and its trajectory towards climate catastrophe? Or do we want to “build back better” in ways that fight climate change, inequality & injustice?


We talk about  building a healthier, fairer, greener province based on a clean economy. We want to support strong climate and clean energy policies needed to build a resilient economy. We know the projects generated from a clean energy framework can put people to work in safe, healthy, well-paid jobs. We understand that a green recovery is a  just recovery and we don’t want anyone to be left behind. 


The Premier’s Economic Recovery Task Force is scheduled to release its findings from the 6 week public consultation process this month. The report aims to provide recommendations on how the $1.5 billion fund set aside for recovery spending will be deployed.  A member of the task force,  The BC Federation of Labour, submitted, “We must make up for lost time in addressing the climate crisis, with an accelerated and inclusive path to a green economy. The global collapse of oil prices is only the latest drastic swing in the fossil fuel economy — and one more sign that a sustainable future must rely on a swift transition to cleaner, renewable sources of energy.” They continue by saying, “We must look beyond economic indicators to human outcomes — our goal entails nothing less than the end of poverty, homelessness and other inequities. And it goes deeper: a meaningful connection to the communities they live and work in and with — even in times of crisis, with no exceptions.” Reading submissions like those of the BC Federation makes it sound hopeful that the BC Economic  Recovery Plan will support a Green New Deal. 

At the same time, however, we continue to invest in fossil fuel projects. The Trans Mountain Pipeline, owned by the Canadian Government, continues to be built despite knowing there is no longer a market in Asia or in the US to sell the gas; that we publicly committed  to climate action in the Paris Agreement; we have a flawed consultation process with Indigenous communities; a  failure to consider the risks posed by increased tanker traffic; ongoing protests and other concerns.  We know that the BC Recovery Plan Task Force is represented in favour of heavy industrial business and is  lobbying to have their projects be financially supported through the Plan.  

The Report
is scheduled to be released this month.  Let’s see how well the  recommendations reflect the importance of workplace safety, strong public services, and our collective responsibility to take care of each other. We have the chance to address those gaps, and to do much more. We can build back better than before.

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Invest locally, achieve prosperity, and build resilient regional economies. A blog in 2013 on the book,  Local Dollars, Local Sense by Michael Shuman, continues to resonate with CCEC as we have always kept your money working in your community. When the book was released in 2012, CEDNET (The Canadian Community Economic Development Network) called Shuman, the “local economy pioneer with his revolutionary toolbox for social change”. 

Shuman shows that by putting our money into local businesses, we build resilient regional economies. In 2012, he said that Americans’ long-term savings in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, pension funds, and life insurance funds was about $30 trillion, but “not even 1 percent of these savings touched local small business—even though roughly half the jobs and the output in the private economy come from them.” 

Here are some highlights from the book that hold true today:

Economic development as practiced today has three dubious characteristics.  It focuses on nonlocal business.  It lacks a coherent framework for assisting local business.  And it is a top-down enterprise.  There is an alternative set of principles and practices—a “local living economies” (LLE) approach to economic development that focuses on local business, creates an entrepreneurial ecosystem that supports them, and invites grassroots participation. 

Starting in the 1970s, the objective of most economic developers became to attract or retain global businesses.  Indeed, one of the most common phrases in the professional literature, even today, is “to attract and retain.”  What this formulation misses is locally owned businesses.  A locally owned business cannot, by definition, be attracted.  And most locally owned businesses, because they have deep relationships to a community through its managers, employees, owners, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders, usually do not require special efforts to retain them. The focus on “attraction and retention” suggests that economic developers have increasingly focused on global big business.

A community prospers when it follows three simple rules: 

Rule #1:  Maximize the percentage of jobs in your local economy that exist in businesses that are locally-owned. 

Rule #2:  Maximize the diversity of your businesses in your community, so that your economy is as self-reliant and resilient as possible.

 Rule #3:  Prioritize spreading and replicating local business models with outstanding labor and environmental practices.

As we restart our economy with a just recovery framework, it is key to support our local businesses and to buy-local.  Banking at CCEC allows us to lend to you, your neighbours, our businesses and arts community. Invite a friend and family to join us today.


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We have an opportunity to build back better. We need a recovery map that fixes the systemic inequalities that are embedded  in our communities. 

It is tempting to want to return to the status quo pre-Covid, but that cannot happen.  There were too many crises raging that will worsen if nothing is done.  For example, last month Vancouver recorded our highest number of opioid related deaths.  Income inequality, an inadequate social safety net and climate change are just three of the crises that must be addressed. 

We have an opportunity to redesign our economic programs, social infrastructure and public services to build an inclusive, fairer and more resilient economy. During Covid we learned that we need to invest in our workers, our shared prosperity and to have economic justice for historically marginalized groups. 

We can all agree that out of Covid, we are more aware of care and compassion.  Dr. Henry’s words, “Be Kind. Be Safe. Be Calm”  resonated with us. 

CCEC was formed in 1976 by groups who were unable to access financial services through banks and other credit unions. We continue working to reduce barriers to open a bank account and to provide equitable and just access to financial services.  

We encourage our members to get involved, speak up and be part of shaping our community economic development.  For example,  @JustRecovery and the #BuildBackBetter campaigns.  Share your stories with us.


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