CCEC Blog
Search
 

Anti-Asian racism has increased significantly during the pandemic. In BC, there have been more violent incidents and hate crimes directed towards individuals who appear to be of Asian descent. There have also been many instances of microaggressions, hostile attitudes, and racist comments during what is for all of us, an already frightening and stressful time.


The release of the booklet called, Challenging Racist British Columbia: 150 Years and Counting, is co-published by CCPA BC and timely in light of recent events. They document how this recent cycle of anti-racist activism is part of a broader history of Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities challenging white supremacy – particularly since 1871 when BC joined Canada.  Unfortunately, the past 150 years of history in BC has embedded systemic racism in our society and institutions. 


The book also recognizes those people who have been doing the work of anti-racism and anti-colonialism in BC for the past 150 years. They say that these historical figures are presented not as addendums to our provincial history—they are its history. 


Challenging racism is a complex issue as we need to work on both ourselves and on our society.  The book says, “the work is to dismantle our own inequities, racism and lack of diversity; and work together transcending privilege and transforming our institutions.”  We all need to rethink where we've come from, and where we want to go in terms of racial equality. 


The booklet is available free - click here to download a PDF - and there will be more resources available to support learning and teaching the histories of racism, resistance and present day anti-racist movements.  You can also click here to register for a virtual Book Launch on March 21 at 3:00pm PST. The event takes place on the UN’s International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination whose theme this year is youth standing up against racism. 


Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

As we turn to online services and rely on the digital marketplace more than ever, it’s important we have the tools and information we need to protect ourselves from online fraud. March is Fraud Prevention Month and we want to share a few tips from the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC).

Everyone is a potential target of fraud. Recent statistics from the CAFC show that in 2020 Canadians lost over $106.4 million to fraud, $62.6 million of which was related to online fraud. The actual impact of fraud is likely much larger as the CAFC estimates that Canadians report only 5% of actual fraud cases.

Anyone who believes they have been contacted by a scammer, is aware of a scam, or has become a victim is strongly encouraged to report it to the authorities. By reporting a scam, authorities will be able to warn Canadians, which may limit it from spreading.

This March, help us fight online scams. Knowledge is power! Join us in the conversation using #FPM2021 and find information to recognize, reject and report online fraud.

From: Competition Bureau Canada

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

March is Fraud Prevention Month: Recognize, Report and Reject. 

If it seems too good to be true, it is. We are all targets for scammers. As we are spending more time and shopping online, our susceptibility and exposure to scams has also increased. The 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report helps to shed some light on how scams are being perpetrated, who is being targeted, and which scams have the greatest impact,  They also provide timely tips on how we can all better protect ourselves from fraud.  Here are a few highlights from the report. 

The riskiest scam reported by Canadians in 2020 was advance fee loan scams. The second riskiest scam was online purchases with the highest type of purchase being for pets and pet supplies. 

Impersonation is one of the most common tactics fraudsters use to perpetrate scams. By pretending to be well-known and trusted companies, government agencies, and organizations, scammers can better manipulate their targets. Scams impersonating Canada Revenue Agency is one of the most common types of impersonation scams.

Who is most at risk to scams?  Younger people lost money to scammers at higher rates than older people. Online purchase scams were the riskiest for ages 18 through 54 and the second riskiest for ages 55+. Romance are riskiest for ages 55 through 64. Fake cheque/ money order scams ranked #2 for the 18-24 ages and #3 for the ages 25-34.

How do you reduce your risk of losing money to online scams? 

  • Asking questions when unfamiliar with something

  • Tending to be skeptical when dealing with new situations

Also, by following these  Ten Tips to Avoid a Scam, you increase your likelihood to avoid most scams and protect you and your family. 

1. Never send money via gift card or wire transfer to someone you have never met face-to-face. 

2. Avoid clicking on links or opening attachments in unsolicited emails. 

3. Don’t believe everything you see..

4. Double check your online purchase is secure before checking out. 

5. Use extreme caution when dealing with anyone you’ve met online. 

6. Never share personally identifiable information

7. Resist the pressure to act immediately

8. Use secure and traceable transactions

9. Whenever possible, work with local businesses

10. Be cautious about what you share on social media.   

March is fraud prevention month. Report any suspicious activities to BBB Scam Tracker, and learn more about the different types of common scams on BBB.org/scamtips       

For more information and helpful tips visit the Canadian Anti-Fraud page.


Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

Search

home | online bankingprivacy code  | contact | site map
© 2015 CCEC Credit Union. All Rights Reserved.