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It’s Mental Health Week and this year’s theme is understanding our emotions. 2021 is the 70th annual Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) campaign rallying to celebrate, protect and promote mental health.  Since the onset of the pandemic, 40% of Canadians say their mental health has deteriorated.  As many people are experiencing a time of unprecedented stress and anxiety, it is even more important that we support good mental health for everyone. 


There are many resources available online to help us address mild to moderate mental health challenges due to work related issues, family worries, sleep difficulties or physical health problems. There are two programs our members may find helpful: the CMHA program called BounceBack® and the Federal Government’s Wellness Together portal. Both these sites aim to be a practical way of learning key life skills that can boost your mood and help you turn the corner. 


They say that good mental health isn’t about being happy all the time. In fact, a mentally healthy life includes emotions like sadness, fear and anger. It is important that we know how to recognize, label and accept our feelings. Naming our emotions, understanding how we are feeling, and taking corrective actions when our response isn’t helpful are all strategies for good mental health.  


We are all in this together and we need to look out for and support each other. The world has changed and we can let people know we are here for them and that they’re not alone. The pandemic has made it more difficult to be together with each other and this lack of social contact has adversely impacted our mental and physical well-being. With this in mind, if you do know someone who is living alone or in a stressful or unsupportive environment, reach out to them. A check-in call goes a long way to keep vulnerable members of our community connected.  


In closing, be sure to take care of yourself so that you can support your family, friends and neighbours. Follow the recommendation on the Wellness Together site and Take 5 to do the mindfulness and breathing exercises. 


This is Mental Health Week. Get Real with your emotions. Visit BounceBack® and the Wellness Together sites to learn more.  


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Improvements are coming soon to CCEC’s online banking. We are adding mobile features and increasing login security. With the enhanced security measures being introduced, we feel that members will be more comfortable switching to online banking or using more online banking services.  

 

A few of the new features include: 

  • Mobile Banking App. 

  • Mobile cheque deposit - take a picture to deposit a cheque to your account. 

  • Get customized Alerts about your account activity sent to your phone or email. 


You will notice improvements on the login screen. It has a new look and you will be asked to set up User Authentication. Here are the three steps to follow: 


  1. On the login screen, you enter your Login Name which is your current Account Number; and your Password where you enter your Personal Access Code (PAC) from the current banking system. 

  2. Set up your User Authentication. Select three questions and enter your answers. 

  3. Pick an image to use as your Personalized Security Image. 


Each time you login, you will be prompted for this User Authentication confirmation. It is random if you answer the questions you set up but the image will be displayed every time you login. The User Authentication takes a few minutes to set up and we feel the increased security will help our members feel more secure and comfortable banking online.


We will be providing our members with more information on the enhancements and improvements to online banking. This is a great time to sign up for Online Banking and switch to e-Statements. Visit our website www.ccec.bc.ca for updates.


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CCEC is proud to be the screening partner for the film, Food for the Rest of Us.  Our film this year explores farming and harvesting as forms of radical activism. Read more about the film and pre-order your tickets today.

Across Turtle Island and beyond, young people are turning their anxieties into action when it comes to sustenance and the human relationship to food. Food for the Rest of Us follows four unique and inspiring food projects that are making a difference in their communities: a youth internship program in Hawaii offers college tuition in exchange for two years’ service on an organic farm; an urban farmer in Kansas City describes his aquaculture initiative as a form of decolonization; a female Shochet in rural Colorado conducts workshops reconnecting participants to a more humane and local meat supply chain; and a community greenhouse takes advantage of short, intense summers to grow fresh produce in the Northwest Territories where, despite the impending threat of climate change, Indigenous methods of food harvesting have continued to thrive. Centering their agricultural practices firmly in their belief that new ways of operating are crucial for our survival, these food activists demonstrate—through word and deed—alternative paths to our culinary future.

Watch the trailer....

Be sure to check out the full festival program and join their special 20th Anniversary events. You can pre-order your tickets and festival passes to watch the films from May 6 - 16. 


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We are inviting our members to donate to the scholarship fund and for our youth to apply for the scholarship to support the registration fee. The YES is running a limited number of smaller programs this summer.  Youth ages 14-18 who want to attend Camp YES this year, please email Joanne. We have Sponsorships to support the Registration Fee.


Last summer, due to Covid, there could be no overnight camps. At that time, the Camp YES staff asked themselves, "What should we do during this time?  As co-operators, the question inevitably became, “How can we best serve our members, or our community?"  They’ve been busy this past year supporting our youth and here is an update on their initiatives: 


  • Created the YES This Journal Activity Book Download a copy

  • YES Camp merch is for sale!

  • The podcast, Care Package, is in its second season

  • Continue to connect alumni with each other for support. If you are a YES Camp or Camp Rainbow Alumni, stay in touch with Camp YES here

  • Produce a regular newsletter - subscribe to their Mailing List


Their 2021 programming for the start of summer includes virtual camps, and weeklong day camps. With ongoing health and safety guidelines, The YES will not be able to facilitate traditional week-long overnight camps. However, they recognize that this may change, and, if so, they will be sure to update you and their programs. Be sure to subscribe to their mailing list and check their website for updates.  At this time, their program is: 

  • Roots Hybrid (Mainland)  July 5-9

  • Roots Hybrid (Island) – July 12 - 16

  • Roots Virtual – July 19 - 23

  • Pathways Virtual – July 26 - 30

  • Leadership Cohort Virtual - TBC


Members may donate to the Camp YES Scholarship Fund by email to info@ccec.bc.ca or by phone to 604.254.4100. Youth ages 14-18 are asked to email Joanne with your application


At CCEC, we are proud of our members who contribute to the Camp YES Scholarship Fund allowing us to supoort the Registration Fee for our Youth.  We also believe that the Camp YES programming is a transformative experience for both campers and parents;  and provides our youth with the tools and skills to create positive change in their family, school, and community.


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We encourage our members to receive the Covid-19 vaccine. While we have all been trying to do our best, it is unfortunate that this past week we’ve seen a surge of more transmissible coronavirus variants. In response, the province announced a ‘circuit breaker’ timeout with new restrictions and a reminder to all of us to avoid indoor social interactions. There is also a rollout plan for the Covid-19 vaccine, and we feel it is a good idea to see our members being immunized.  

 

Up to date information on the Covid-19 vaccine can be found on the Immunize BC website.  While the main vaccination program is age-based, the province has responded to higher risk of transmission places so that teachers and front-line staff are also receiving the vaccine. In addition, some pharmacies in Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal health have been able to offer the AstraZeneca COVISHIELD vaccine for people aged 55-65. 

 

We appreciate that it will still take time for all of us to be vaccinated. Online registration is open for eligible people living or working in BC. For more information, the Get Vaccinated website is available in 11 languages and you can follow Immunize BC multilingual posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.   Keep up to date and be sure to share information with family and friends. 

 

The BCCDC (BC Centre for Disease Control) has launched BC COVID-19 SPEAK Round 2. We’re over a year into the pandemic and our public health officers are asking you to tell them how you are doing. Last year, almost 400,000 British Columbians took the time to participate in the survey called, BC COVID-19 SPEAK: Your story, our future and it provided valuable information about how British Columbians experienced the first wave of the pandemic.  

 

As we move into the next phase of the pandemic, we send a gentle reminder to all our members to please be safe, be calm and be kind - we’re all in this together.



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Are you planning to purchase a new property or renovate your existing one? Do you want to learn more about your borrowing options at CCEC? Call or email Derek, our Mortgage Loans Officer to learn more.  Derek recently joined our staff at the credit union and has been working with members to make sure the process is easy and as stress free as possible.

When it comes to something as important as taking out a mortgage, you want to make sure you are making the best decisions for your situation. Derek is here to walk you through the options and work with you to get pre-approved for a mortgage.

At CCEC, we provide first and second mortgages for purchase of a residential or recreational property. Moving your mortgage to CCEC may be easier than you think. If your friends and family need assistance with a mortgage, please have them get in touch with us. We have helped many new members because their "bank" couldn't help. Help your friend, the credit union, and our local community!

At CCEC, we keep your money working in your community.  

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Anti-Asian racism has increased significantly during the pandemic. In BC, there have been more violent incidents and hate crimes directed towards individuals who appear to be of Asian descent. There have also been many instances of microaggressions, hostile attitudes, and racist comments during what is for all of us, an already frightening and stressful time.


The release of the booklet called, Challenging Racist British Columbia: 150 Years and Counting, is co-published by CCPA BC and timely in light of recent events. They document how this recent cycle of anti-racist activism is part of a broader history of Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities challenging white supremacy – particularly since 1871 when BC joined Canada.  Unfortunately, the past 150 years of history in BC has embedded systemic racism in our society and institutions. 


The book also recognizes those people who have been doing the work of anti-racism and anti-colonialism in BC for the past 150 years. They say that these historical figures are presented not as addendums to our provincial history—they are its history. 


Challenging racism is a complex issue as we need to work on both ourselves and on our society.  The book says, “the work is to dismantle our own inequities, racism and lack of diversity; and work together transcending privilege and transforming our institutions.”  We all need to rethink where we've come from, and where we want to go in terms of racial equality. 


The booklet is available free - click here to download a PDF - and there will be more resources available to support learning and teaching the histories of racism, resistance and present day anti-racist movements.  You can also click here to register for a virtual Book Launch on March 21 at 3:00pm PST. The event takes place on the UN’s International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination whose theme this year is youth standing up against racism. 


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As we turn to online services and rely on the digital marketplace more than ever, it’s important we have the tools and information we need to protect ourselves from online fraud. March is Fraud Prevention Month and we want to share a few tips from the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC).

Everyone is a potential target of fraud. Recent statistics from the CAFC show that in 2020 Canadians lost over $106.4 million to fraud, $62.6 million of which was related to online fraud. The actual impact of fraud is likely much larger as the CAFC estimates that Canadians report only 5% of actual fraud cases.

Anyone who believes they have been contacted by a scammer, is aware of a scam, or has become a victim is strongly encouraged to report it to the authorities. By reporting a scam, authorities will be able to warn Canadians, which may limit it from spreading.

This March, help us fight online scams. Knowledge is power! Join us in the conversation using #FPM2021 and find information to recognize, reject and report online fraud.

From: Competition Bureau Canada

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March is Fraud Prevention Month: Recognize, Report and Reject. 

If it seems too good to be true, it is. We are all targets for scammers. As we are spending more time and shopping online, our susceptibility and exposure to scams has also increased. The 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report helps to shed some light on how scams are being perpetrated, who is being targeted, and which scams have the greatest impact,  They also provide timely tips on how we can all better protect ourselves from fraud.  Here are a few highlights from the report. 

The riskiest scam reported by Canadians in 2020 was advance fee loan scams. The second riskiest scam was online purchases with the highest type of purchase being for pets and pet supplies. 

Impersonation is one of the most common tactics fraudsters use to perpetrate scams. By pretending to be well-known and trusted companies, government agencies, and organizations, scammers can better manipulate their targets. Scams impersonating Canada Revenue Agency is one of the most common types of impersonation scams.

Who is most at risk to scams?  Younger people lost money to scammers at higher rates than older people. Online purchase scams were the riskiest for ages 18 through 54 and the second riskiest for ages 55+. Romance are riskiest for ages 55 through 64. Fake cheque/ money order scams ranked #2 for the 18-24 ages and #3 for the ages 25-34.

How do you reduce your risk of losing money to online scams? 

  • Asking questions when unfamiliar with something

  • Tending to be skeptical when dealing with new situations

Also, by following these  Ten Tips to Avoid a Scam, you increase your likelihood to avoid most scams and protect you and your family. 

1. Never send money via gift card or wire transfer to someone you have never met face-to-face. 

2. Avoid clicking on links or opening attachments in unsolicited emails. 

3. Don’t believe everything you see..

4. Double check your online purchase is secure before checking out. 

5. Use extreme caution when dealing with anyone you’ve met online. 

6. Never share personally identifiable information

7. Resist the pressure to act immediately

8. Use secure and traceable transactions

9. Whenever possible, work with local businesses

10. Be cautious about what you share on social media.   

March is fraud prevention month. Report any suspicious activities to BBB Scam Tracker, and learn more about the different types of common scams on BBB.org/scamtips       

For more information and helpful tips visit the Canadian Anti-Fraud page.


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Wednesday, February 24 is Pink Shirt Day -  Anti-Bullying Day -  when people wear mainly a pink shirt to symbolise a stand against bullying.  Did you know:

  • Two out of three youth have faced bullying over their cell phones or online. 

  • Three out of ten bullied students reported missing school at least once.

  • Three out of five LGBTQ+ students feel unsafe at school.  

  • Every seven minutes someone is bullied on a playground in Canada.


A recent survey also found cyberbullying surpassed drugs and alcohol as the top concern among Canadian parents.  Bullying affects us physically, emotionally and mentally and is a major problem in our schools, workplaces, homes, and online. Bullying comes in many forms, including but not limited to verbal attacks, physical violence, threats and intimidation.


This years’ Pink Shirt Day theme is, “lift each other up”.  The focus is on working together and treating others with dignity and respect. The pandemic has affected us all and shown the importance of helping one another and advocating for those who need it.


Chances are that you or someone you know is being impacted.  How we respond to bullying as a victim or witness is important. Over 90% of bullying incidents have peer witnesses. But when those peers intervene, most incidents are quickly resolved.  


Remember that kindness and compassion can go a long way.  It is important to support healthy self esteem and teach empathy, compassion and kindness. There are many resources available for parents, caregivers and our youth.  Visit the Pink Shirt Day website for more information.  Make every day an anti-bullying day!


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