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This years’ film follows the director and fellow members of her community, as they are gradually expelled from their central Toronto neighbourhood by Vancouver-based developer Westbank, which recently began building 800 rental units on the site of legendary bargain department store, Honest Ed’s.  

The film supports our belief that housing is a basic human right. We all need a place to live and a community that is affordable, clean, and safe. Unfortunately, we are seeing the impact of redevelopment pressure on local businesses, people and the fabric of our communities. Working together, let’s make sure that our Restart Plans include housing that is equitable and just.”  


We also know the important roles that arts and culture are playing to help us recover from the pandemic. A DOXA spokesperson says, “We believe that documentary cinema holds power within moments of social momentum and change, and is a valuable tool in interrogating these unjust systems and institutions. We also believe in anti-racist education, increased mental health services, housing initiatives, income security, harm reduction services, accessible rehabilitation, arts and cultural programs, social workers, conflict resolution services, transformative justice, and other vital community-based systems.”


We agree that housing is a vital community-based system.  We need to build the kind of housing Vancouver needs and support social housing, guaranteed below market rental, moderate income rental, workforce housing, co-ops and co-housing.


CCEC is pleased to be the DOXA Festival Screening Partner for the film, There's No Place Like This Place, Anyplace . Let us know what you think. 


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Housing and land-use regulation are the biggest factors in affordability; those are responsibility of provincial, regional and municipal governments. There's little the federal government can do to improve housing affordability.

Learn more. CCEC has partnered with DOXA as a screening partner for PUSH, a global view on the housing crisis.

So the benefits of the recently announced federal government’s measures will be modest. For example, the increased RRSP withdrawal is equal to only six months of the average house-price increase since 2000. Between 2000 and 2015, average house prices increased about three times the increase rate of incomes.

The shared-equity mortgages, for example, would be available only to first-time-buyer households with annual incomes under $120,000. The CMHC mortgage limitation would further restrict the maximum mortgages to $480,000. Shared-equity mortgages are not very effective in Vancouver where most house prices are too costly for a $480,000 mortgage.

Yet the housing affordability crisis is serious. Vancouver ranked as the second-least affordable among 90 major metropolitan areas in nine nations in the latest Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey(released in Canada by the Frontier Centre for Public Policy), trailing only Hong Kong. 

The Vancouver housing-affordability crisis has also developed as our City Government has developed some of the most restrictive land-use policies in the high-income world. 

With our local urban-containment policy, denser, high-rise housing offers virtually no help. In Vancouver, condominium prices are nearly equal to detached house prices 10 years ago. This does not take into consideration the smaller size of condominiums compared to houses. Moreover high-rise condominiums provide no yards in which children can play, which makes them less family-friendly.

The average detached house in Vancouver averages about $1.5 million. Cities including Victoria and Kelowna now show average house prices equaling the $1 million in Toronto.

Solving Canada’s housing affordability crisis will require provincial, regional and municipal action. It must start with addressing the price of land, which is the proximate cause of both the housing affordability and cost-of-living crises.

(Points from National Post article by Wendell Cox, senior fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy, co-author of the Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey and author of Demographia World Urban Areas.   https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/why-ottawas-attempts-to-help-young-canadians-afford-housing-simply-wont-work)

CCEC is pleased to partner with DOXA as a screening partner for PUSH, a global view on the housing crisis.

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DOXA Film Festival

CCEC was proud to sponsor the recent screenings of Occupy the movie, at the DOXA Film Festival. The film provides a great perspective on the protests, the police response, the media coverage, and the analysis behind the actions. The Occupy Movement is still with us, and many of us with them. The issues that provoked mass protest remain as well - abuse of power and privilege, fraudulent leadership, unduly complex intercompany contracts, the transfer of wealth, and an absence of accountability. One message is worth repeating, "Un-Bank".

You may want to read Mother Jones piece on the Rating Agencies and the banking crisis of 2008.

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