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“Keystone pipeline shut after spilling 1.4 million litres of oil” reads a headline on October 31, 2019. Did you know that our pipeline, Coastal GasLink, is a project of the same corporation funding the Keystone XL and Energy East Pipeline projects?  All pipeline projects are wrong for many reasons and today, we are asking our members to support our members the Unist’ot’en Brigade Society, the Mountain Protectors, the Wilderness Committee and other groups saying, NO to all pipelines. 

How can you get involved?

The Unist’ot’en Brigade Society, wants your help to get the story out to the larger public.  They released, INVASION, an 18 minute powerful film that covers many of the events of the last year.  They want you to share with friends and host a screening in your community!  

Their press release says, “In this era of "reconciliation", Indigenous land is still being taken at gunpoint. INVASION is a new film about the Unist'ot'en Camp, Gidimt'en checkpoint, and the larger Wet'suwet'en Nation standing up to the Canadian government and corporations who continue colonial violence against indigenous people.”

Join a conversation and tea to learn more. 

November 13th from  7pm - 8:30pm at Kafka's,  2525 Main Street,

you can meet a couple of  Unist’ot’en Brigade Society supporters. They can also let you know more about volunteering  at the Unist'ot'en Camp. 

INVASION the film

Simply download the film here, make a Facebook event using this graphic, and download and print the poster designed by Gord Hill. You can host anywhere from a living room to a local theater.

Email robertages@telus.net for any help you need organizing an event or if you have any questions.  Their website has resources to help as well.

Join the “We Support the Unist’ot’en and the Wet’suwet’en Grassroots Movement” facebook grouphttps://www.facebook.com/groups/SupportWetsuweten/about/ 

The  hereditary chiefs have spoken, “NO to all pipelines.”  At CCEC, we stand in support and are asking our members to also support the Indigenous movements for self-determination.

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As an intervenor on the NEB process, CCEC stands in support of our members saying NO to the pipeline.  Here is what some of our members have to say.

“It’s ridiculous! The economic case for this pipeline is from 2012,” said Wilderness Committee Climate Campaigner Peter McCartney. “How can you argue these impacts are justified at all, let alone based on a dying industry doomed to fail.”

Ian Marcuse, Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Network says, "The NEB decision is deeply troubling. The loss of species and food sources for indigenous communities speaks to the economic, corporate interests prioritizing over environmental and cultural well-being.”

The Mountain Protectors say, “We are outraged and utterly disappointed by the NEB’s decision to prioritize profit for a fossil fuel corporation above the health and well-being of all people, the land, the ocean and all life that depends on the health of the land.  The NEB decision endangers our long-term well-being by pushing to destabilize the climate when we urgently need to transition to renewable energies.”

Dawn Morrison, with the Wild Salmon Caravan and chair of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty says, “The NEB structures and processes are one glaring example of how the system is failing in its ability to implement collectively held Indigenous title and rights and Free and Prior Informed Consent, and adequately assess the 1).inter-generational equity of both present and future generations in decision making matters impacting the broader ecological, cultural and temporal scope and scale of Indigenous land and food systems, and 2) assess cumulative impacts to our climate and complex system of Indigenous biodiversity and cultural heritage.”

So, what happens next?  The federal cabinet will mull over the NEB’s report, and continue consultations with Indigenous communities, before they make a decision on whether on not to proceed with building the Trans Mountain expansion. With 5.4 billion dollars sunk into purchasing the pipeline, most likely the government is going to green light the project.

Peter McCartney, Wilderness Committee continues by saying, “It’s a travesty Trans Mountain has never, and likely will never, receive a proper, thorough environmental assessment.  We will continue to stand behind Indigenous nations that have never consented to this project.”

Dawn Morrison’s final words on their press release says, “STOP the Trans Mountain Pipeline that is threatening the health and integrity of Indigenous social and ecological systems for the benefit of all!”

While the report found that the project would have "adverse effects on southern resident killer whales" and that greenhouse gas emissions from tankers would be 'significant', they approved it anyway. Today’s announcement is bad news for all of us who support Indigenous rights, understand climate change is real, and are committed to making sure Trans Mountain never gets built at all.

For more information like and follow these groups:

Wilderness Committee

 Mountain Protectors

Stop KM Legal Defense Fund

Wild Salmon Caravan

Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty

Read the NEB Report here.

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The Yarrow Eco Village released photos and other details on the loss of salmon spawning grounds in the Upper Fraser. The issues are well set out in the Huffington Post article.  The pipeline croossing of a local salmon bearing stream had gravel beds 're-installed', but they have been eroded quickly, leaving no suitable terrain for the fish to lay eggs. .  

Yarrow Eco Village (a CCEC member) was one of several intervenors at the National Energy Board, and this environmental damage was just one of the issues raised as a concern in the review process.  The review process that was found to be inadequate by the courts subsequently.  

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Image result for yellow vestsSeveral stories in the news feature angry gripes and protests.  Too often the superficial issues get the attention - a carbon tax, a luxury home tax or a pipeline.  Councillor Christine Boyle is represented in a recent piece properly identifying 'inequality', growing inequality, as the key issue.  She is right.

The BC government taxes are an attempt to re-balance taxation, but those who have homes valued in excess of $3M cry out that they are 'victims'. Entitlements, such as those we have given to homeowners and which benefit those at the upper end very handsomely, will not be given up easily.  We need to shine a light on these entrenched economic advantages if we are serious about egalitarianism,  

Many in the 'yellow vest' protests in Paris express their discontentment as added tax burdens are placed on ordinary people.  This is the core sentiment communicated by individuals on the street.  The street, in this case the Champs Élysées, is a venue for conspicuous consumption for the very wealthy, who are obviously distressed, not that the rabble are rising, but that their limo's may need to go elsewhere.  

And then we have the climate conference in Poland, where again rich nations delay action.  A sense of entitlement reigns. The recent IPCC report raised alarm, saying that warming is advancing faster than foreseen.  The BC government issued a new Climate Change Plan, but just as with the Canadian government initiatives to date, the actions are to little and even contradictory.  Vested interests, moneyed interests, such as the oil and gas industry, are not only 'entitled' but well integrated into the political apparatus that we have created. 

The discontentment that is growing may have dramatic implications.  Many, such as Chris Hedges, champion local community organizations as the key counter force to large scale capitalist machinations. 

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Choose Democracy

The "No" side on Proportional Representation want you to be afraid this Halloween. And every other day.

Make no mistake; the "No" side is using the same scare tactics that got Trump elected. A disturbing irony for a group claiming Proportional Representation will usher in an era of "extreme right-wing" parties and "Nazi fascism".

Does that claim seem a little inflammatory, or hyperbolic? Maybe even irresponsible fear-mongering to divide people? Well, it is. But it's also their official stance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Tuh2bJapng

Besides being an appalling lie, the ad underscores the "No" side is not operating on facts or good faith. There are valid arguments which could be made from the "No" side, but instead they are trying to scare you. Fear is a powerful motivator, but a terrible policy. These tactics should also make you keenly aware of the fact an argument on facts favours "Yes". How better accounting for each individual vote is opening our province to views currently not even on the political radar is baffling. But it sure is scary...

And if we want a more modern example of a failure in a system, we can look to our 'partners' to the South. They use First Past the Post. Are we supposed to conclude their extreme right-wing ideology is a function of the First Past the Post system? I would say the argument is far more complicated.

But perhaps the better question we should be asking is whether we want our system to be more or less like that of the United States. The answer should be obvious.

Yet it really is not right now. The vote is too close to call, but there is hope: https://theprovince.com/news/bc-politics/mike-smyth-the-yes-side-won-the-first-week-of-the-referendum

Vote "Yes" and tell everyone you know to vote too!

- Denis Flinn

 

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Our 'housing crisis' is not a local issue, it is the result of global capital flows and the rich pursuing their interests.  That is the argument outlined in The Tyee; William Rees puts the case forward - referencing economics and ecological logic. This is a very good analysis.

Rees also also builds links to the growing foreign investment in agricultural land all around the world. The free flow of capital alters local markets and undermines local communities; putting democratic institutions at risk.

 

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"There is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan" say the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly.

Secwepemc elders, youth, children and families are calling for an immediate shutdown of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline in light of the forest fires raging through their territory. They fear the pipeline poses a serious safety hazard. They also say the unprecedented increase in fires is evidence of global warming created, in part, by Alberta tar sands oil transported by Kinder Morgan.

"We are in a critical state of emergency dealing with the impacts of climate change,” said Secwepemc teacher Dawn Morrison, adding “this includes catastrophic flooding and fires, as well as social issues such as poverty, increased violence against our women and high rates of death from substance abuse in our communities.”  

Morrison, founder of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty, says “the health of our families and communities relies heavily on our ability to harvest wild salmon and access clean drinking water, both of which are at risk if the Kinder Morgan pipeline was ruptured or impacted by the fires.”

The Secwepemc’ulecw Assembly is demanding a moratorium on any pipeline proposing to transport crude or diluted bitumen through their vast traditional territory where they are stewards of the forests, fields and waterways that flow from the Rockies on their way to the ocean.

The Assembly met last month to reaffirm its territorial title and authority saying, “We have never provided and will never provide our collective free, prior and informed consent - the minimal international standard - to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Project.

We explicitly and irrevocably refuse its passage through our territory. Investors take note, there is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan. Kinder Morgan will not pass through Secwepemc Territory.”

To view the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly Declaration visit: secwepemculecw.org

For interviews contact:

Jeffrey McNeil – 416.720.4358

Kanahus Manuel – 250.852.9002 or 323.804.5106

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Wild salmon are our most important Indigenous food and cultural and ecological keystone species. Indigenous communities have celebrated the spirit of wild salmon for thousands of years, and we are deeply concerned about the health and survival of them. Wild salmon provide a powerful metaphor for unity, so come swim with us. Get involved in the WSC 2017 October 7-12.  Volunteer to plan the caravan.   Follow us on facebook for more detailed information coming soon.

 

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Say NO to Kinder Morgan.

The National Energy Board has approved the expansion of the Kinder Morgan pipeline with numerous conditions.  “It was always likely to be approved.  But we know this megaproject is not in the economic and social interests of our members” says Helesia Luke, CCEC Board Member.  Vancouver Mayor Robertson says, “NEB pipeline process a 'sham,' new Liberal plan not much better.”  Peter McCartney, Climate Campaigner with the Wilderness Committee says, “The NEB has ignored and wasted the time of countless communities, First Nations and individuals who have stood up to oppose this irresponsible pipeline proposal.” 

McCartney continues by saying, “British Columbians have made it crystal clear this pipeline is not welcome in our communities.  No new process is going to change the widespread Indigenous opposition, the unacceptable risk of a spill, the massive climate impacts or the shoddy economics of this project.”

You may recall that CCEC Credit Union was granted Intervenor status, the only financial institution to do so.  We held a public forum in June 2014, over concern that the NEB process was not open, accessible and objective.  We wanted to make the debate more public and complete.  Read the blog

We need everyone to turn out to the meetings in the coming months to show Ottawa and the rest of the country that when we say no – we mean it.  We also need to turn the heat up on our MPs in the Lower Mainland.  Write letters, call offices, show up at events.  Our representatives must put a stop to this! 

Speak Out Against Kinder Morgan!  Learn more – see the map posted by the Wilderness Committee of community and First Nation concerns, and a pledge form where you can find out details of the meetings as they become clear.

 

BACKGROUND:

Click the articles for more information:

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Dan Lewis, a grassroots protester who participated 20 years ago in one of the largest acts of civil disobedience in Canadian history, has started Clayoquot Action to address the areas’ new threats.  The area known as the “Last Great Rainforest” is threatened by a proposed open pit copper mine by Imperial Metals, salmon farms, and the risk of oil spills if pipelines are built from Alberta to BC. 

Dan moved to Tofino in 1991 to operate ocean kayak tours in an area he calls the best kayaking locale in BC.  However, he quickly realized he had to get involved in conservation efforts out of self-defense.  He says, “The places I loved to visit, the wildlife living there, and my own livelihood was being put at risk by transnational corporations.”  He adds that, “Through this work I met people like my current partner Bonny Glambeck who helped me understand the linkages between various forms of oppression—that racism and sexism are related to human’s destruction of the environment.”

Looking back at the Clayoquot Summer 1993, he says, “As a movement we learned that when many people come together and contribute their talents, time and money, great things can be accomplished.  Using feminist consensus process, we were able to create joint actions in which all participants had a sense of ownership.”  Fast forward 20 years and Clayoquot Action is taking a fresh approach working to protect biocultural diversity using research, education, and peaceful direct action.  The conservation group stands for indigenous rights, democratic rights, and the rights of Mother Earth. 

Dan says the conservation movement has changed.  He says, “It's hard to believe that we were able to organize the mass protests (12,000 people participated) by faxing posters to health food stores.”  He comments on the changes noting that social media has made it easier to communicate and organize; environmental threats are taken far more seriously with most people acknowledge that mining disasters and oil spills are bad, and that climate change is real.  He feels there was a real awakening of ecological consciousness in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, and it feels like such times are upon us again.

Clayoquot Sound is a household name because of past environmental battles, in particular environmentalists working in solidarity with First Nations.  The Nuuchahnulth nations have never surrendered their sovereignty, and still have the knowledge and ability to manage their territories.  Dan says that many people think Clayoquot was protected after the 1993 protests, but this is not true.  He believes that Clayoquot Sound is a symbol of hope.  Your support is needed to ban open pit mining to prevent a Mount-Polley-type disaster, and stop the pipelines to prevent the risk of an oil spill. 

Even if you never go to Tofino and Clayoquot Sound, we all have a responsibility to protect the environment and fight the transnational corporations from destroying our land.

If you find yourself in Tofino in July or August, check out Clayoquot Sound of Freedom,  every Tuesdays at 8pm.  Free admission. 

For more information and to lend your support: 

·         info@clayoquotaction.org
·         1-877-422-9453
·         http://clayoquotaction.org/

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