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We lend to your neighbours and local businesses.  We have always invested in the regenerative and circular economy.  We don’t need to change our course of investment or divest from ‘fossil fuel’.  We stand by what we believe in that works for you and our community. 

We are proud of the impact we have in our  community and in the lives of our members. Our solidarity with our brotherhood and our hereditary chiefs continues. We will not waver. 

“Thank you for having ethics and representing the community (us members) so well.  A great moment to ask folks to divest from unethical banks to move to us.”  CCEC Member

Our number one priority is to serve - and provide a model for services to - those facing systemic barriers to financial services, to credit, and to economic opportunity. Too many are turned away by conventional banks and are exploited by cheque-cashing hucksters and others.  We want to work with our members and member groups to develop services that meet those needs at fair cost. 

Refer friends, family and neighbours to join CCEC. Stand by us.  Call us today. 


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Camp registration is Open!  A CCEC tradition is to see the “Camp YES Thermometer” go up in the branch. The “Thermometer” tracks the funds donated by our member-owners to pay the camp registration fee for our youth. Each year, through the generosity of our members, we have sent up to 10 youth to the YES Camp and a few to the Reunion. 

Meet CCEC Members, Helen Spaxman and her teen, Claire. Claire has been to camp and to the Reunion. Helen’s family started donating to the Camp YES Fund for many years even before having kids. She says they donated because they hoped that their children and the youth of our community would be able to go to this camp.

Claire Says, “Thank You” 

“At the YES Camp, we do “reflections” at the end of the day, where we reflect on how our day went and then answer questions, which are sometimes light and funny, but sometimes very personal and heavy. 

When I truly opened up in reflections, I benefited by getting things out of my head that I wouldn’t normally talk about with people at home. Before camp, I felt like I couldn’t talk to my friends about certain things, maybe I didn’t want to burden my friends with my thoughts. I was also afraid it’d start rumours and more people would know about it than I originally intended. 

I have learned that YES Camp is a safe space, I can talk about anything there and get so much support from the staff and my fellow campers. Funnily enough, many of these “fellow campers” have become very close friends. Now that I’ve been to camp a few times, I’m not just a good communicator and listener at the camp, but I’m also applying these skills to my friend group at home. 

Since I’ve started opening up to friends at school, I’ve noticed so many more people sharing things with me that they never thought they’d share. My friends now feel the same comfort in talking about their feelings that I used to only feel at camp and they’re not afraid to ask me for help when they need it. I’m so so grateful to have been able to  attend YES summer camps and fall camp reunions. I’ve grown so much as a person and as a friend and I’m so ready to grow even more. Honestly, without the YES Camp, some of my closest friendships wouldn’t even exist.”

“Camp YES is a Game Changer!” says Helen Spaxman

For more information, visit the Camp YES website. To make a donation to our Camp YES Fund, call us or visit the branch. Youth interested in being sponsored to attend Camp are asked to complete an application form that will be available on our website.
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THE PEOPLE'S PROM is a fundraiser for creative resistance and direct action. It's a radical, community-oriented, annual event in East Vancouver held Feb. 14th.  It is a queer, cross-dressing, big dress wearing prom you never had in high-school.

The Prom Committee is a volunteer-run group of seven individuals who organize the People’s Prom and oversee the People’s Trust Fund. Since 2001, they have raised funds and provided micro-grants of $200 - $5,000 to grassroots organizations for initiatives that may have difficulty securing funding from other sources. Several grants are given out annually.  Check back for their funding application.  

Over the years the fund has given micro-grants to Indigenous groups, women’s centres, anti-poverty and homeless activists, environmental and anti-pipeline initiatives, political arts festivals, and transit education. In the last 20 years, they have given out an estimated $80,000 in micro-grants.  There are CCEC Member associations including No One is  Illegal who have received funds from the People's Prom. 

Congratulations! 

A big shout out to the other nominees this year:  Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks, Alliance Against Displacement and Mountain Protectors. 

The award is in recognition of an individual who contributed lots of time and effort to the early years of CCEC and who had a strong interest in community development.   Hence the award goes to member groups that are active in social justice and co-operative development activity. The award is comprised of three elements; recognition from our community, our commitment to promote the project further through CCEC, and a financial contribution from the Roger Inman Trust to support the project.

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Businesses that manufacture, import and sell products need to be responsible for the waste they generate. They need to be accountable for their products beyond selling them and change their manufacturing process “to design out waste and keep products and materials in use”.  Businesses need to use less plastic and stop producing single-use items. This shift in responsibility and accountability from consumer to business also entails recognizing the Circular Economy. 


Currently, Coca-Cola is one of the biggest producers of plastic waste. In 2019, it was found to be the most polluting brand in a global audit of plastic waste by the charity Break Free from Plastic. Nestlé is third in the list of top plastic polluters globally as 98% of their products are sold in single-use packaging. There are hundreds of multinational brands contributing to plastic pollution across the globe.


Did you know that seventy-nine percent of the world’s plastic is not recycled?  Our consumption of packaging and single-use items has a real impact on climate change: just under 30 percent of our greenhouse gases come from the way we make, consume, and dispose of stuff.  We know that compostables don’t outshine plastics when it comes to environmental benefits, and biodegradable packaging is even worse. We are overwhelmed with the quantity of  waste we cannot process. Our single-use culture needs to change and the solution is not in recycling. 


We need a solution that will have a positive impact on the environment and mitigate climate change.  Tell Us Yours! One strategy is a program called Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR). EPR’s push the manufacturers and retailers to contribute to the cost of collecting and reusing their products.  Businesses can introduce take-back programs or arrange waste collection and drop-off points, so the products can be re-purposed and re-introduced for another manufacturing process.


Adopting the Circular Economy model, we can design stuff better to last longer; food chains and toy makers can make better quality goods; producers can use fewer raw materials; waste can be made a resource; excess can be discouraged in schools and homes; we can shop hyper-locally and at secondhand shops, where, in an ecologically literate world, should be seen as pioneers of a new kind of socially aware consumerism.  


Vancouver has a plastic ban bylaw and a single-use-item reduction strategy as action to support their Zero-Waste 2040 Goal.  Over the next year we will see changes in the food industry as we ban styrofoam, plastic straws and plastic shopping bags. These are great steps and we need to do more. 


Let’s work towards a circular economic model and invest and shop locally, avoid buying products from the plastic polluters and advocate for increased manufacturer responsibility to avoid waste.

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Another report card, another stagnant rate. One in five children still lives in poverty in BC, as reported in  First Call’s 2019 Child Poverty Report Card.  However, despite BC seeing 18 years in a row with higher than national average child poverty rates, there has been progress and advocates insist there are solutions.


First Call’s 23rd Annual Child Poverty Report Card was released on January 14, 2020.  They report that the overall poverty rate across Canada is shrinking and credit the federal Canada Child Benefit (launched in July 2016); and the increase in household incomes for families receiving welfare and disability payments.  It is anticipated that further poverty reductions will be achieved when BC’s new Child Opportunity Benefit comes into effect this fall. 


There have been successes, however, First Call also says that “For the first time since 2009, we see an increase in lone-parent families to make up over half of BC’s poor children”. In addition, the data shows that nearly half (44.9%) of the kids living in poverty identify as recent immigrant children, one-third (30.9%) as Indigenous children living outside of First Nations communities and one-quarter (23%) as racialized (2016 census). 


There is more work to be done. Next month, the BC Budget will be released. What would the poverty reduction advocates like to see supported by the government?  The list includes increasing the number of $10-a-day child care centres, offering No-Fee Childcare spaces for those families earning $45k or less, increasing income supports and providing affordable housing, targeting efforts to help those who have a higher risk of living in poverty, increasing the minimum wage to $15 per hour, raising income and disability assistance rates in line with actual living expenses (up to 75 per cent of the Market Basket Measure) and indexing them to inflation. The BC Poverty Reduction Coalition also says that the province’s poverty reduction strategy must adopt a gender-based lens to analyze how men, women, and non-binary people experience poverty differently.  


BC now has a poverty reduction strategy called, TogetherBC. We’ve seen positive impacts from the strategies that have been implemented so far.  And, yes, we can improve. If we want to live in an equitable and just society, we need to find solutions to address the systemic barriers facing those living in poverty. 


For more information:


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Invest in you and your future with an RRSP.  RRSP’s continue to be a good investment fit for many of our member-owners’ financial plans and lifestyles.


There are two main reasons our members invest in an RRSP:  to reduce taxable income (paying less tax in that year); and to be saving tax-free as (taxes are payable later on withdrawal in what would be a lower income year).  At this time, you can contribute up to 18% of your 2019 earned income, to a maximum of $27,230 plus any carry-forward contribution room that you may have until the year you are 71 years of age. 


If you would like to contribute, ask us about an RRSP loan so that you can maximize or top-up your RRSP contribution (before March 2, 2020).  You may be able to save tax dollars by investing the funds from the loan into your RRSP. By starting a monthly contribution plan, you can earn compound interest making more than if you contribute a lump sum. 


RRSP’s are considered longer-term retirement investments. However, you can withdraw funds,  for use towards the Home Buyers’ Plan or the Lifelong Learning Plan; which must be repaid within a specified time.  A word of caution before you resort to withdrawing from your RRSP - look for alternatives and talk to us. 


Are RRSPs worth it in the long run? Even though you have to pay the tax back when you withdraw the funds, yes, they are worth it. They are a valuable tool to reduce your tax burden and save for the future. Be sure to include an RRSP as an investment option in your financial plan. And, be sure to review your plan each year.  


Need a plan?  We can help you with that.


Call us today to speak with one of our investment specialists. 

Pick up the leaflet, Your Guide to Understanding RRSP’s in the branch or visit the CRA website for more information. 


A Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is a retirement savings and investing vehicle for employees and the self-employed in Canada. Pre-tax money is placed into an RRSP and grows tax free until withdrawal, at which time it is taxed at the marginal rate.

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